Sexual Identity, Page 2

Sexual Identity, Page 2

Possibility of change in sexual orientation becomes a function of frequency of imprinting with the same sex partner.  That is, the greater the frequency in these early ages the less chance for change.  The less frequent the imprint, the greater the chance for change.  As you can see “change” has many variables and is not an easy expression of will – I want to or I don’t want to.

The third developmental group is the typical adolescent, approximately age 13-18.  In this age group there may be experimentation with the same or opposite sex.  This is usually considered a normal variant for this age.  However, another variable enters here.  The individuals normal sex drive.  Sex drive itself is a given.  Those with high drive will normally look for a greater variety of experiences while those with a lower drive will limit their exploration.  At these ages initial contact with the same sex or opposite
sex becomes important in determining sexual preference.  Also sexual contact of an opposite nature from initial contact adds another complex variable.  If there is repeated contact with the same sex or with the opposite sex then sexual preference is usually set.  Acceptance by the partner becomes another complex variable, which helps determine preference.

In this third group there are currently too many variables to accurately predict the formation of preference.  Suffice it to say that bi-sexuality, homosexuality and heterosexuality derive from these adolescent experiences.  If the issue of change in preference ever exists – it does so where sexuality was determined during adolescence.

The heuristic value of this developmental theory of sexual preference demands research.  Once there is adequate research some conclusions about accepting all human beings as equals regardless of sexual preference can be put to rest.  The reduction of prejudice for unchangeable givens, whether it be male, female, white, black, gay, heterosexual can ideally lead to a greater bonding of the human race.

In this group as they reach adolescence, they struggle with the question of their sexual identity but more often than not they “know” that they are going to select the same sex partner.  There may be sexual exploration with opposite sex partners during adolescence but their inexperience with them and their discomfort with the same sex partner over-rules.  Occasionally a very successful heterosexual experience may sway them but only to confuse them further.  They have been successfully imprinted.

Possibility of change in sexual orientation becomes a function of frequency of imprinting with the same sex partner.  That is, the greater the frequency in these early ages the less chance for change.  The less frequent the imprint, the greater the chance for change.  As you can see “change” has many variables and is not an easy expression of will – I want to or I don’t want to.
The third developmental group is the typical adolescent, approximately age 13-18.  In this age group there may be experimentation with the same or opposite sex.  This is usually considered a normal variant for this age.  However, another variable enters here.  The individuals normal sex drive.  Sex drive itself is a given.  Those with high drive will normally look for a greater variety of experiences while those with a lower drive will limit their exploration.  At these ages initial contact with the same sex or opposite
sex becomes important in determining sexual preference.  Also sexual contact of an opposite nature from initial contact adds another complex variable.  If there is repeated contact with the same sex or with the opposite sex then sexual preference is usually set.  Acceptance by the partner becomes another complex variable, which helps determine preference.

In this third group there are currently too many variables to accurately predict the formation of preference.  Suffice it to say that bi-sexuality, homosexuality and heterosexuality derive from these adolescent experiences.  If the issue of change in preference ever exists – it does so where sexuality was determined during adolescence.

The heuristic value of this developmental theory of sexual preference demands research.  Once there is adequate research some conclusions about accepting all human beings as equals regardless of sexual preference can be put to rest.  The reduction of prejudice for unchangeable givens, whether it be male, female, white, black, gay, heterosexual can ideally lead to a greater bonding of the human race.